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1
Analytic icon 2 Analytics found
Date Created1992-02-06
DescriptionIn this one hour and forty minute unedited video, the fourth grade class was divided into pairs to work on a Towers problem on February 6, 1992. At the beginning of the session, there are two sheets...
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DescriptionIn this second of five clips from a single class session, the students consider how 3 candy bars could have been equally distributed among their class of 25. The students had worked on this problem...
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Analytic icon 1 Analytic found
Date Created1992-02-06
4
Analytic icon 2 Analytics found
DescriptionIn the last of five clips from a single class session, the researcher reviews with the students how to place whole numbers on a number line. The students are then asked to decide about the placement...
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DescriptionIn this clip, the first of five clips from a single class session, the researcher asks the students to review how they were able to show that 1/4 is larger than 1/9 by 5/36. The students had worked...
6
Analytic icon 2 Analytics found
Date Created2014-04-27
DescriptionIn this problem solving session two students, Brandon and Colin, are working to solve the pizza problem when selecting from four toppings [problem statement is below]. Brandon and Colin both organize...
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DescriptionIn this 8 minutes whole class discussion about early algebra ideas (specifically with regards to integers), Researcher Robert B. Davis models adding positive and negative integers to a class of...
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DescriptionIn the second clip, David and Meredith worked on building models to represent their solution to the problem: Which is larger, two thirds or three quarters, and by how much. David first built two...
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DescriptionIn the fourth clip Erik repeated the explanation of his model to the classroom teacher. His model consisted of a train of three orange and one dark green rod and lined up four blue rods. He lined up...
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Analytic icon 2 Analytics found
DescriptionIn the sixth clip Erik and Alan worked on the task: Which is larger, one half or three fourths. Erik showed, using the orange and red train as one, that the difference between the two fractions was...